88 results for pelvic floor

  • postnatal pelvic floor

    Love Your Postnatal Pelvic Floor

    “How, when and what for exactly” does returning to exercise look like for most women after having a baby?   The lovely Clare Maddalena from Lushtums shares her views and advice for postnatal exercise and caring for your pelvic floor

    The usual recommendation for postnatal exercise is to wait for 6 weeks post birth if you had a vaginal birth and a whopping 8 weeks if you had a caesarian, but what if you reach these milestones and you’re still not ready?

    Let’s face it. There’s a LOT of social pressure out there to be an idealistic super mum. How we look, our attributes, personality, career, how we birth our babies, feed them and then how quickly we get back in shape.  It’s LOT to get right – and for most of us simply impossible.

    Ok, stop!! Let’s go back to our original question around post birth exercise …that is “how, when and what for exactly” Let’s start with the easiest bit to answer.

    WHEN?

    Whilst the standard recommendation to safely return to postnatal exercise is around 6 to 8 weeks, the true answer is if you don’t feel ready, give yourself a break! Managing your baby, lifting, stretching …all use up energy and burns up your calories. For many new mums,  what’s needed is REST.  Pop in moments each day to recharge. Make it part of your routine. Feeding for example should be a chance to sit quietly. Breathe deeply. Ground into wherever you are sitting in the moment (literally become aware of your feet on the ground and your back resting again the chair) and enjoy a very yogic practice of becoming present, becoming mindful. Just BE there. No phones, no distraction. Feeding your baby is the perfect time to develop an inner mindfulness practice, reducing stress and anxiety and helping towards your overall sense of well-being. Slow down and enjoy these moments.

    Some of us however will want to return to exercise soon after we’ve had our babies. If you enjoy it, do it! Exercise releases endorphins and that lovely after-glow high, so if this contributes to your overall mental and emotional health (as well as of course physical fitness), go for it! Just be mindful of what we mention next…

    HOW?

    So the early days of having a baby is a massive adjustment. But when you are ready, start your postnatal exercise routine by building your foundations first –  especially those muscles that have taken most of the load of pregnancy.  Yes! We’re talking pelvic floor muscles!

    These are part of a group of muscles that provide our deepest core support. And when these are engaged and functioning we feel supported inside and out, helping us physically and contributing to a greater sense of general grounding and wellbeing.

    Even just a week after giving birth, you should start finding these muscles again with some super gentle pelvic floor exercises.

    Give this a go in a seated position (perhaps while feeding) or when you are resting.  Start by exhaling (imagine you are blowing out a candle) and, after a couple of seconds, gently lift your pelvic floor in and up. It feels as if you are trying not to wee or break wind, and ideally you can also feel the walls of the vagina drawing together. Once you get to the end of the exhalation, and you’ve drawn these muscles in and up gently (only using about 3 out of 10 strength wise), then release, relax completely and inhale into a nice soft belly. Repeat. Be cautious, don’t rush to 10 out 10 strength wise, as you’ll actually by-pass the all important pelvic floor and go straight to your 6 pack. In the early stages, until you get this right, less is actually more.

    Include several rounds of repetitions into your day. Working well? Now practice doing this breath and holding your pelvic floor to gently brace your core BEFORE you lift anything – whether it’s your baby or a bag of shopping.  Remember this helpful mantra, “Lift on the inside first, then lift on the outside”. You can even start to maintain your ‘exhale – and squeeze’ while pushing the buggy out on a walk. Just build it into your normal day and rhythm.

    Regular practice before lifting anything or when out walking, will help restore your pelvic floor and your inner core (transverse abs too, so you may feel your tummy gently drawing in) and help prevent much more serious issues such as incontinence and even prolapse.

    You should be 100% sure you have regained connection, control and then automatic function of your deep core (including your pelvic floor and transverse abs) and probably worked a bit on your glutes too), before returning to your regular pre-birth activities.

    Some of us will get there sooner than others and if you did lots of activity before, your recovery is likely to be quicker. But I truly  believe you need to spend the time doing this inner practice to lay the correct foundations.

    WHY?

    Well simply put, I have worked with so many women who launched back into their old fitness routine and, while they are fit and strong on the ‘outside’ of their bodies,  have totally missed the ‘inner’ work.

    I often see fit, active women who, instead of building the foundations first, have gone straight for the walls and the roof:  with no supportive foundations to take their load and hold their bodies up, they struggle with incontinence or still have separated tummy muscles long after they’ve given birth.

    Running, jumping, sit ups, crunches, planks or squats – all create extra load and extra pressure downward. Only once your deep inner muscles are working appropriately to take that weight and support is it advisable to start a stronger form of exercise.

    So the mantra is return to exercise as soon as you feel you comfortably can – the earlier you do, the better it is but get this ground work in first. Then progress with caution, back to a more regular exercise routine.

    And lastly, we answer the WHAT FOR EXACTLY part of the question. You are doing this for YOU! No one else. Not for the comparison with celebrities, or even your former pre-baby self. But for YOU. The bit of you that knows deep down she needs to honour herself and her body.

    Eat well, MOVE WELL and remember to REST well. It all goes into the mix of helping us feel more whole and complete.

    And one final note:

    If you’re struggling with prolapse or incontinence, persisting beyond working on your core with these exercises or from attending specialist classes such as postnatal yoga, exercise or Pilates then consult your local Women’s Health experts/physiotherapists/osteopaths. It’s not taboo – loads of women suffer with this – so speak out and go get help!

    FittaMamma
  • Postnatal legs butt and pelvic floor mother and baby workout

    You & Your Baby Working Out Together: Legs, Butt & Pelvic Floor

    Congratulations on your new arrival!

    If you are ready to start your postnatal workouts, but are limited for time with the high demands of your new bundle of joy, try these quick and easy postnatal workouts that you can do with your baby by pre and postnatal fitness expert Emma Bord!

     

    Legs

    Squats holding your baby – a carrier can also be used for this

    Squats into shoulder press
    Squat down holding your baby then as you come to stand take your baby up in the air. Core engaged throughout – this is a fully body move!

    Single leg lunges holding your baby as a weight

    One legged side raises
    Standing on one leg raise and lower the other leg, core engaged for balance – ten large raises, ten pulses and ten point and flexes of your feet. Be careful with this – you may need to start without the baby holding on to the wall! It does get easier!!

    Pelvic Floor

    Hugely important area to work after having a baby to avoid any accidents. Think about drawing up from your downstairs area, as if you are stopping yourself going to the toilet. At the same time engage your stomach muscles by drawing your stomach in towards your spine.

    Superman
    Raising opposite arm and leg, keeping your trunk as still as possible

    Spinal Raises
    Lifting from the centre of your spine and then slowly arching the back in the opposite direction. If you have diastasis recti this is one to avoid

    Bridge
    Lying on your back, feed hip width apart knees bent. Place your baby on your hips and slowly raise your pelvis into the air, engaging then core and pelvic floor. Hold at the top squeezing your buttocks together

    Core Activation
    Sitting or standing, place your hands on your stomach and slowly draw the belly button into your spine, hold for 5 seconds and release. Keep the shoulders relaxed.

    Get in touch with Emma Bord:

    On Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, or visit her website.

    FittaMamma
  • Post pregnancy core exercise video

    Postnatal exercise video: core & pelvic floor

    Follow this exercise video to safely activate and strengthen your core and pelvic floor muscles!

    Let us help you loose your mummy tummy and regain strength after having your baby! Once you have had to go ahead form your doctor you can safely exercise again start following this safe postnatal exercise video with Lottie from Just The Girl Fitness. She will lead you through a workout which will tighten up your core muscles and strengthen your pelvic floor while having some fun! This workout can be done anywhere, so pop it on when your baby is sleeping and enjoy the benefits!

     

    FittaMamma
  • Pregnancy yoga for pelvic floor strength

    Pregnancy yoga video: Pelvic floor

    Want to strengthen your pelvic floor? Prenatal yoga poses and breathing techniques can help you during pregnancy and after your baby is born!

    It’s so important to keep your pelvic floor muscles strong! Whatever pregnancy workout routine you prefer it’s important to find time to concentrate on your pelvic floor exercises.
    Your pelvic floor is the sling of muscles that go from front to back between your legs, from your pubic bone to the base of your spine, supporting your bladder, womb and bowel. As Clare Maddalena from LushTums explains, the pelvic floor muscles play an important role in pushing your baby out during birth. This prenatal yoga exercise really helps you concentrate on the pelvic floor, lifting, squeezing and controlling the muscles at different levels!

    For more ways to prepare for labour watch these prenatal breathing techniques videos or these ways to control the pain with yoga breathing and control.

    Always consult your midwife or doctor if you have any concerns about your health, your pregnancy or the health of your baby.

    FittaMamma
  • Pelvic floor exercise pregnancy

    Pregnancy exercises for pelvic floor

    It’s so important to remember your pelvic floor muscles! Here are some our pregnancy exercises to keep your pelvic floor strong

    Remember your pelvic floor exercises!!

    Your pelvic floor is a sling of muscles that runs from your pubic bone at the front to the base of your spine at the back, supporting your bladder and bowels as well as your uterus. The weight of your growing baby puts increased pressure on these muscles and they can become weakened, leading to potential stress incontinence when you laugh,cough or sneeze.   Pelvic floor exercises are so important for pregnant women and should be worked on regularly throughout your pregnancy to maintain their strength – but the good news is that you can exercise you pelvic floor at any time or place and no-one will even know!

    Simple, regular exercise for your pelvic floor really does make a difference. Try to do three of the exercises below five to seven times a week (ideally more often)  throughout your  pregnancy, starting again immediately after your baby is born. Ideally get into a routine of doing them at a set time each day; maybe when you sit down at your desk, after your dinner or before you have a shower.

    To do a pelvic squeeze pull up around your bottom as if you were trying to stop a bowel movement and around your vagina as if you were trying to hold in a wee. The contraction should pull up the whole ‘sling’ of muscles in between your legs. This will help you remember!

    How to do pelvic floor exercises:

    Standard contractions

    Pull in your pelvic floor muscles. Hold for two to three seconds (as tightly as possible) and release. Do this ten times. Repeat three times. This may be hard to start with, but try to build up to ten repetitions.

    Elevator contractions

    Pull in your pelvic floor muscles one-third of the way and hold. Pull them in another third and then hold. Pull them in all the way as tightly as you can and hold. Release using the same three steps. Repeat ten times.

    Wave contractions

    Pull in the muscles around your bottom, then all the way along to your front pelvic floors. Hold, then gradually release in a wave motion. Repeat ten times.

    Pregnancy pelvic floor exercises aren’t the most sexy, exciting exercises in the world and you don’t get a buzz from doing them in the same way you do from a good workout, but they really are an essential and fundamental part of your exercise programme, so do your best to fit them in and you should prevent any lasting damage. Combine these exercises with the rest of your pregnancy workout and prenatal cardio sessions!

    FittaMamma
  • chickfit-pre and postnatal exercise
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    ChickFit, Alix Hubble, pre and postnatal exercise in Warlingham, East Surrey

    ChickFit-pre and postnatal exercise

    ChickFit-pre and post natal exercise

    A Women’s Health & Fitness Coach, specialising in pre and postnatal exercise, postnatal massage, diastasis and c-section healing, pelvic floor and core dysfunction.

    FittaMamma
  • NCT postnatal yoga class LISS
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    NCT Mother & Baby Postnatal Yoga Classes, Liss

    Mother & Baby Yoga

    postnatal yoga class NCTA unique and fun postnatal yoga class designed for mum and baby.

    Here is a wonderful opportunity for you as a new mum to ease your way back into exercise after the birth of your baby. Discover how yoga can help you stretch, strengthen and tone your body.

    Whether you are new to yoga or reconnecting with it, these classes will restore your sense of wellbeing. Just be sure you have had your six/eight week check from your GP before starting.

    The sessions include gentle yoga for your baby so you can practise together. Music and rhymes throughout the class creates a fun and relaxed atmosphere.

    Benefits of Mother and Baby Yoga:

    • Strengthening and toning your muscles, especially abdominals, pelvic floor and back.
    • Encouraging you and your baby to find time and space for relaxation.
    • Using the breath to increase calm and confidence.
    • Improving your sleep.
    • Promoting understanding of your baby’s development.
    • Engaging and bonding with your baby.

    Classes are run by NCT Specialist Practitioners who have undergone extra training in teaching postnatal mother and baby yoga and relaxation.

    FittaMamma
  • Logo Amanda Fay
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    Amanda Fay Pre & Postnatal Corrective Exercise, Concord NH

    Amanda Fay image

    Hello! My name is Amanda and I offer individual pre and postnatal health coaching and exercise training virtually and in person as well as instruct pre and postnatal group fitness classes in Concord, NH. As a pre and postnatal corrective exercise specialist, I have extensive training in using exercise and rehab techniques to correct muscle imbalances and ensure proper movement patterns to avoid or reverse pain and injury. Areas of focus in my one on one training and group classes include: The Bloom Method Belly Pump (diaphragmatic breath work), pelvic floor and core development, functional training, labor training, diastasis recti rehab, pelvic floor rehab, and c-section rehab. As a holistic health coach, my areas of focus include pregnancy preparation, goal setting, nutritional guidance, stress reduction, fertility awareness, mindfulness, sleep solutions, and birth plan preparation.

    Visit my website to set up a complementary session today!

    FittaMamma
  • NCT postnatal yoga class HEATH-REACH
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    NCT Mother & Baby Postnatal Yoga Classes, Heath & Reach

    Mother & Baby Yoga

    postnatal yoga class NCTA unique and fun postnatal yoga class designed for mum and baby.

    Here is a wonderful opportunity for you as a new mum to ease your way back into exercise after the birth of your baby. Discover how yoga can help you stretch, strengthen and tone your body.

    Whether you are new to yoga or reconnecting with it, these classes will restore your sense of wellbeing. Just be sure you have had your six/eight week check from your GP before starting.

    The sessions include gentle yoga for your baby so you can practise together. Music and rhymes throughout the class creates a fun and relaxed atmosphere.

    Benefits of Mother and Baby Yoga:

    • Strengthening and toning your muscles, especially abdominals, pelvic floor and back.
    • Encouraging you and your baby to find time and space for relaxation.
    • Using the breath to increase calm and confidence.
    • Improving your sleep.
    • Promoting understanding of your baby’s development.
    • Engaging and bonding with your baby.

    Classes are run by NCT Specialist Practitioners who have undergone extra training in teaching postnatal mother and baby yoga and relaxation.

    FittaMamma
  • NCT postnatal yoga class SOLIHULL
    w2dc_listing

    NCT Mother & Baby Postnatal Yoga Classes, Solihull

    Mother & Baby Yoga

    postnatal yoga class NCTA unique and fun postnatal yoga class designed for mum and baby.

    Here is a wonderful opportunity for you as a new mum to ease your way back into exercise after the birth of your baby. Discover how yoga can help you stretch, strengthen and tone your body.

    Whether you are new to yoga or reconnecting with it, these classes will restore your sense of wellbeing. Just be sure you have had your six/eight week check from your GP before starting.

    The sessions include gentle yoga for your baby so you can practise together. Music and rhymes throughout the class creates a fun and relaxed atmosphere.

    Benefits of Mother and Baby Yoga:

    • Strengthening and toning your muscles, especially abdominals, pelvic floor and back.
    • Encouraging you and your baby to find time and space for relaxation.
    • Using the breath to increase calm and confidence.
    • Improving your sleep.
    • Promoting understanding of your baby’s development.
    • Engaging and bonding with your baby.

    Classes are run by NCT Specialist Practitioners who have undergone extra training in teaching postnatal mother and baby yoga and relaxation.

    FittaMamma
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